Clark Iron Hawk,  46 years old attends the powwow hoping to make a little extra money in the dance competition. He wears a beaded costume his wife imade him by hand. Aside from occasional work as a day laborer, it’s one of the only ways to make money for people like him who live far outside of Eagle Butte.  Hawk says the shortage of jobs makes life on the reservation difficult. Hawk knows hardship–his 16-year-old son died a few years ago from seizures. Epilepsy is a common
problem on the reservation. He says dancing in the powwows gives him a sense of pride and spiritual focus.

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Resources

"Secretiveness is especially common among welfare recipients, almost all of whom have non-welfare income that they conceal from the welfare departments."

- Making Ends Meet: How Single Mothers Survive Welfare and Low-Wage Work, by Kathryn Edin and Laura Lein

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